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granted himself sweeping powers. that prompted some judges to call for an indefinite strike. >> germany is reported to be considering the export of tanks and armored vehicles to saudi arabia, a country which is already -- has already used its weapons to put down a popular uprising in the country neighboring. >> they say that hundreds of boxer armoured patrol vehicles -- should the deal goes through, it would make the government an accomplice to islamist extremists, some said. >> saudi arabia is reportedly looking to purchase several hundred of these boxer armoured patrol vehicles. "der spiegel" magazine says this was discussed last week at a meeting. a government spokesman declined to comment. >> confidentiality protect interest of potential buyers, as well as our relations with such countries. many requests are turned down. even if they are proved, they often do not ultimately lead to a deal. >> the blonde is where -- the bundeswehr currently uses the boxer as a transporter. it could be used to crush popular uprisings. germany's opposition is concerned that the saudi royal family, whic
the victors of the war. hitler had invaded germany in 1941, and they fought back against the germans, and they kept going against berlin. >> define stalinism. >> stalinism was a developed system of control. it believed it could control everything, not only in politics and economics but social life, civic life, sports clubs and chess clubs. in the stalinist system, there were no independent institutions of any kind. no independent voices of any kind were allowed to speak. all the economy was under state control, and all of society was. there was a cultural aspect, too. the arts were under stalinist control, and there was a cold of stalin himself. his portrait hung everywhere. there was a cult of stalin himself. >> i grew up in a small town of indiana, and one of my streets, you talk about radio casuth. >> he was was a hungarian hero of an earlier time. there was a radio, and they adopted the name of a previous deliberate thing hero, and in 1956 he would have to call it anti-stalinist radio. >> what was the circumstance? >> 56 is the end of the stalinist period. he died in 53, and afte
is cutting 1300 jobs as part of a 750 million euro cost-cutting program. >> it is germany's third biggest power company. most of the job losses will be among support and administrative staff. the company has struggled financially from having to shut down to below of its nuclear reactors over safety fears in the wake of the fukushima disaster. >> ratings agency standard and poor's has downgraded cypress again. its sovereign debt already has junk status. now it has gone down two more notches. >> cypress says it needs a decision on an international bailout within days to avoid a default. international monetary fund says talks are unlikely to be concluded this year. it needs the bailout to save its banks, which are heavily exposed to greet debt. well, germans are losing their appetite for spending money. consumer confidence has fallen for the second month in a row according to market research group gfk. >> they polled 2000 german shoppers and on the 0 digit overall economic picture, their own financial outlook, and plans to shell out cash for big-ticket items this christmas. they concluded th
help in the coming days. >> in germany, a surprise announcement at deutsche telekom as the chief executive says he will step down at the end of next year. >> he has struggled with structural problems at telecom since taking over in 2006. the firm has faced challenges to its foreign business entities as well. the shrinking demand in germany for its land line services. the chief financial officer will take over at the beginning of 2014. well, european markets closed little changed on thursday, but slightly to the upside at new 19-month highs. our correspondent said as the summary from the frankfurt stock exchange. >> the end of the era was a surprise to traders in frankfurt but did not worry them because his successors were known at the financial markets. it looks like a well-organized change. shares were up, but for dutch bank, the problems are getting worse. the towers have been searched again, and yesterday, the bank was convicted in milan. the shares have been lower. the german dax took a little break from its christmas -- christmas rally and closed barely unchanged. families s
moments of the year here in germany, and those include some quite big controversies. >> the nobel prize in literature awarded to the chinese author was particularly controversial. the author has been criticized for not speaking out about censorship in china as well as the country's treatment of dissidents. >> a german writer also sparked a row through his criticism of israel in one of his poems. >> you might have seen the german film "barbara." it wanted a video awards. more on that after a short break. >> do not go away. >> welcome back. thousands of syrians have been fleeing the violence in their country, many seeking refuge in camps across the turkish border. like there has become increasingly hard, due to the extreme harsh weather conditions. >> apart from big aid organizations, small relief organizations are also trying to collect funds. we met one young man also trying to collect in berlin. >> pounding the pavement of the german capital, he wants to convince berliners to donate money to syrian refugees. many of them are freezing in camps on the turkish border. >> if you do have th
a class action suit against germany in a court in the western city of bonn. >> those claims are related to an air strike ordered by a german officer in northern afghanistan in 2009, which killed 90 civilians. germany had given some compensation to the victims' families without admitting responsibility. >> lawyers representing survivors of the air strike are demanding higher compensation -- more than 3 million euros in total. they complain the settlements arrived at immediately following the attack were too small. as far as the german government is concerned, the case is closed. >> 5000 u.s. dollars was paid in over 90 instances. this money was transferred to an account in afghanistan. the account was specifically designed to compensate these families. >> on september 4, 2009, a u.s. f-15 fighter jets bombed two fuel tankers, killing more than 90 civilians. a german officer called in the air strike based on faulty intelligence. the political repercussions were extensive. the german defense minister at the time was forced to step down for his handling of the affair. >> coming up later in
germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territory always in the future so today we have a united germany that trades immensely with poland and has had a wretch most wall -- to approach what and where the european union and the nato or meant to keep russia out and the germans down now they are triumphant economically. germany may not have the solution to every economic problem
democrats i chose to poland, hungary, and east germany. they have different historical background. they belong to different empires in the 19th century. they have different political traditions and mostly because they have given experiences of the war. germany was nazi germany. poland resisted very strongly. the nazis had one of the most resistant movements in europe. the hon variants were different. hungarians- the were different. i was interested in how did they react and the subsequent process of sovietization. >> how would you describe the situation in the country's today, the lifestyle, the economy, the openness to democracy and all that? >> all of them are democracies. east germany is not east germany. it is part of germany, so it is indistinguishable. west germany is poorer in some ways than poland, a country that has recovered more vigorously than the eastern part of germany. poland is a very vibrant democracy, maybe to vibrant -- too vibrant, but it plays a very important and central role in europe. it is a member of nato. it is the largest of the former east european cou
for the united states, but for the world economy, too, also for germany, but people do not know, and they do not like the prospect of a decision may be taking more time, may be even reaching into the year 2013. it would be a pretty bad start, a rumbly start to the new year, people think. the trading was careful. the shares lost some momentum in late trading, late european trading when the u.s. began in the negative zone, and the fact that people were nervous also demonstrated by a lot of money going into the suppose it's safe haven of german bonds and into gold. >> let's take a look at the latest market numbers for you, starting in germany. the dax ended the day just a tad up. euro stoxx 50 also made gains on the day. crossing over to new york, the picture is quite different. a lot of pessimism there. the euro gaining some ground against the dollar. it is not the only source of uncertainty in the world economy. >> a leading economic think tank says confidence is down in many german sectors compared to this time last year. the big picture does not actually looks so bad. >> the economy may hav
. >> germany's economic performance has been strong, but its future is intricately tied to the future of the euro zone. that will create significant dangers for the chancellor, angela merkel. nick spicer reports from berlin. >> let us gaze and peer as best we can into the crystal ball of angela merkel's year ahead. as the euro crisis swarlede -- about her, she emerged as perhaps the world's most powerful woman and certainly germany's most popular politician. but 2013 could well be a year of living dangerously for her. they rallied the troops in september. >> we've kept our promise. through our leadership, germany has emerged stronger from the euro crisis than when it entered it. >> merkel repeated, mantra-like, her tough stance on bailouts and the need for belt tightening. but the problem is that even coming in fishs in the elections won't be enough. >> she has a very unstable combination, and in the german political system it's impossible to just dominate everything with one party so she needs a coalition partner and her current one which she would consider to be her favorite coalit
invaded germany in 1941 and a font back against the germans and they kept going to berlin. c-span: defines stalinism. >> guest: stalinism was a developed system as i say in it was a system of complete control. the stalinist state believed he could control everything. he could control not only politics and not only economics but it could control social life and it could control civic life. it could control sports clubs and chess clubs. in the stalinist system, there were no independent institutions of any kind and no independent voices of any kind were allowed to speak. all the economy was under state control and all of society was. and there was a cultural aspect. the arts were under stalinist control and there was also it cult of stalin's portraits that hung everywhere. all of society was organized around his name and his image. c-span: i grew up in a small town in indiana and one of the main streets in my neighborhood was chris's street. it's not the way you pronounce it but you talk about radio causes in here. we never knew what causes was. >> guest: he was a hungarian hero of 1948, of
markets incidentally, too. bond markets, the fixed income markets, here we're seeing buying in germany at the moment and 10-year german bund around 3%. a little bit of buying into the gild as well as some of the safe haven trades back on. we have this italian bond auction. the first one is going to be settled in 2013 and the last one in this year, as well. it's thought that it is going to see solid demand given that it hasn't gotten any trouble getting off the ground as of late with those bond auctions, as well. a quick wrap on the forex market. here you're looking at selling in the euro/dollar right now. 1.3190. we're flirting with the high level of this trading range that we've been stuck in. dollar/yen, it's thought when this new japanese government coming into place, they're simulating the economy and to make sure a weaker yen is in place, as well. kelly. >> louisa, thanks. we're keeping an eye on gold today. could the precious metal be losing its luster come 2013? we'll find out why kuts has decided to cut exposure to the precious metal for the first time. >>> hello, everybody. we
of pigsticking making headlines in spain. property rises in germany are leaving some without a home. and mistaken identities in poland's presidential plane crash. there's something rather medieval in the idea of a sport where men on horseback chase while boris with spears. it is an archaic sport, once hugely popular in spain. then it was banned, but now it is making a comeback. this traditional hunting method is being legalized by a number of regions. even the spanish environment ministry is backing the move, hoping to see a rise in takings in national parks as a result of people buying hunting permits, but animal rights activists are far from happy, calling the horseback hunting savage. >> this is a story from spain about wild boars and a controversial method of hunting them. but it is also a story about a country in crisis and how one is sacrificed for the good of the other. this is a member of the old gentry. hunting has been in his family's blood for generations. he is helping revive the tradition of hunting wild boar on horseback with spears. the sport, known as pigsticking, was long banned,
germany, considered a leader on environmental protection, has come under criticism. the mayan minister could not live up to his promise. environmental groups say it is largely down to chancellor angela merkel. >> merkel has not use her voice strongly enough, and that is why the situation in the eu is so critical. it is lacking a leader, and effects are being felt everywhere. >> climate experts warn that if emissions do not sink in the coming years, the consequences will be dire. a new climate treaty is due before 2020, but after events in doha, that is looking more unlikely than ever. >> as we saw in that report, the german environment minister is playing a key role in the climate talks. we asked if he thought there would be a breakthrough. >> first of all, we are in the middle of a very, very important and difficult negotiation process. i expect negotiations going on all day and probably all night. we are very much family dependent to achieve as much as we can in the summit. i hope that we will be able to have another commitment perido -- period under the kyoto protocol. i hope as wel
controversy about what to do with the house. >> the river forms the border between germany and austria here. the quaint town with its 16,000 inhabitants is located on the austrian side of the border, but it is a place with a historical burden that the town's patron saint can do little to avert. it is adolf hitler's birthplace, and it has inherited a real estate problem. . the address of hitler's birthplace is an expensive property in the center of town. it has been in the since last year -- it has been empty since last year. braunau's mayor suggested turning the house into rental apartments. the idea was turned down, but a solution still has not been found. the house's owner possibly shares and certain responsibility for that. she originally rented out the property to local government, but now, she appears hard to reach. >> at the moment, i cannot speak to the owner personally. >> my attempt to get in touch with the proprietor also failed. i would like to have asked for a few questions. such as why the cast-iron letters still adorn the house. they are the initials of hitler 's private secre
. an agreement still seems pretty elusive at this moment. germany and french finance ministers have very different views about oversight of banks. and in britain, the chancellor george osbourne delivers his statement to parliament today. will be out in westminster soon. steve is out to give us more detailed analysis of what to expect. let's just go back to the eurozone. as you say, thin advances here. are we capping -- it's up against the yen as well. there's obviously been a big yen story. >> yeah, i think the euro/yen has had perhaps more to do with eu euro/dollar than anything else. the euro crosses in general have been story rather than euro/dollar and euro/yen at the forefront. i think the euro/yen forecast is overplayed in what japan will ultimately deliver on. but mum is pretty good. i think you still play for a little yen weakness. i think we'll see a lot of people trying to buy yen back because i don't think we'll get delivery in all these preelection promises. >> do we all think we know what the chancellor is going to say? >> judging by the many pages being given to it in the n
won't do particularly well, but germany and italy maybe next year have a potential surprise on the upside. >> how much of a surprise? >> it will not be a fast recovery. the ecb will be forced to do more, but they'll be drald dragged into it. so things will have to get worse before they act. so i don't really think -- >> what more actions? they have a t program waiting to go. what more actions are you talking about? >> the key policy rate for the ecb is likely indeed in the first quarter. they can take dpopt deposit rate negative. by the middle of next year, they'll be doing outright qe. i've been talking about this for ages. they haven't done it so maybe they won't do it. but i'm assuming that the outlook for inflation for the eurozone is -- >> how are they going to get around -- look, i know the bundes bank has a fear of hyper inflation. i just don't -- are they going to get around all the -- because even if they do it on the inflation mandate, are they going to get around the objections about outright money printing? germans would see it as that. >> they would see it as ou
be integrated into how a nation gets its power. more on that after this break. >>> in germany right now there's been a real revolutionary transformation of the grid there. i have some video looking at what the kind of new german energy future or present looks like. you have times when half the power in germany is being produced by renewables. you have a tremendous explosion of wind and solar generation. how did this happen, dave? how did germany begin to undertake this? >> it's a fascinating story. the german law doesn't cost -- this is what it says. it doesn't cost the government any money. electric rate payers pay an extra fee to subsidize people who install solar or wind. people who install solar and wind are guaranteed a higher than market rate of return for something like a decade. these are called feed-in tariffs to keep with green's, you know, aptitude for great terminology. >> screw it. tomorrow we're doing an how on that. >> yes. i had dinner with the parliamentian in germany that got this passed last year. i asked him, this one law is like a lever transforming one of the biggest ind
that account for rising income inequality in canada or, indeed, even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? i mean, it's happening all over the world, it's also happening in emerging markets. but i think it is important to face that scary because if you see it just as a political phenomenon, you know, you're going to lose sight of what i think is the biggest challenge which is that these, actually, quite benign economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, how he sees it is he said, look, the big drivers are probably these economic forces, but the issue is that particularly in the united states the politics instead of trying to mitigate these very powerful economic forces has exacerbated them. so even as you have these economic forces creating much, much more concentration at the very top, you expect politics to sort of try to so much that blow. social institutions to soften that
miles inside time in his east germany but was still a free city protected by the western powers. in november 1958, khrushchev delivered an ultimatum. the west had to be out of berlin and six months, or else. this is a crisis, the greatest crisis of the cold war up to that point. the press, congress and much of the eisenhower administration this men were. we need to show resolve, it was said, to beef up our troop strength and get ready to divide the red army. meeting privately with his advisers and congressional leaders, president eisenhower said we aren't going to do that. indeed he said we're cutting our forces in germany by 50,000. is advisors and accounting were bewildered. cut our troop strength? won't that show went to this -- won't that show weakness? i was all alone. he was heavily criticized in the press. but he is seen utterly unfazed. i've now had a great capacity to take responsibility. the amazing that famous photograph taken of ike on the eve of d-day, june 1944, general eisenhower as a supreme allied commander wearing his uniform and talking to a group of paratroop
and the flash point was berlin, the former german capital, 100 miles inside east communism germany, but still a free city protected by the western powers. in 1958, there was an ultimatum. the west had to be out of berlin in six months or else. this was a crisis, the gravest crisis of the cold war up to that point. the prez -- the press, congress, and the administration thought if meant war. we needed resolve to beef up the troops' strength and defy the red army. meeting privately with the leaders, president eisenhower said we're not going to do that. indeed, he said, we're cutting forces in germany by 50,000 men. his advisers and the congressmen bewildered. cut the troop strength? won't that show weakness? ike was all alone and heavily criticized in the press. he seemed utterly unphased. eisenhower had a great capacity to take responsibility. he may have seen that famous photograph taken of ike on the eve of d-day in june 1944. general eisenhower, the supreme allied commander, wearing normal uniform, talking to a group of paratroopers, geared up, faces blackened, ready to jump mind german lin
the soviet troupes out of eastern europe. going to let nato take over germany. unite germany and nato can have their germany as long as nato doesn't go further. these kinds of things are in the air. what does bush do? tianimen square happens, he suspended relations, but behind the scenes does business as usual with china. he goes into panama, in december '89 -- never forgot that because i had -- born on the 4th of july was opening that day, and the american people loved it. they backed the invasion. it was our backyard, it was a war on drugs and that was new issue now. communist had been forgotten. noriega was the new stalin, and then a year later, we had this iraq 1, and that's another untold story. iraq 1 was really depressing when you go into all the false intelligence and the doctoring of the photos. do you want to tell us about that? it breaks my heart personally, and as a veteran of the vietnam war, i see the next ten years we drift. we don't take advantage of the possibles with the soviet union, to keep it stable. we privatize with russia and then by the time the bush 43 comes in,
hollande did not get everything on his wish list. germany insisted that smaller banks, which make up a large part of its banking system, be overseen by national authorities, and it got its way. >> it is important to have a clear division between banking supervision and monetary policy. >> the supervisor will begin work in march, 2014, and be responsible for banks holding more than 30 billion euros in assets. the deal should ensure european taxpayers no longer have to foot the bill when financial institutions find themselves in trouble. >> i'm very satisfied. contrary to expectations, the 27 finance ministers have managed to save the european council. >> as for the question of who will succeed john graja and kurt as head of the eurozone, that is something members -- jean-claude junkecker as head of the eurozo, that is something members still have to decide. >> is this decision basically admitting that national governments are no longer able to keep their countries' banks in line? >> no. first of all, it is admitting that if you have a common currency, then you actually need to have co
the war after germany attacks the soviet union in 1941 the united states and the british decided they are going to support the soviet union because it is the key to the chance of surviving the war during the soviets and to keep the soviets in the war. they were caught so off guard that they were concerned and the soviets are going to capitulate that but they offer several things and the soviets make several demands and promised the material and have a hard time delivering that in the first couple years but stalin says if you give the airplanes and the other equipment we need we can stay in a war. so that is the sincere effort other people are not quite as sincere and providing that. so the second demand, what they want with the concession that they had gotten from hitler in the 1939 pact, and their main demand was for the second. they were fighting. this is the history of this period the americans and the british troops out most of the work were fighting the not provisions combined and there were fighting to hundred, so they were desperate for the united states to open a second f
in the communist in the anti-fascist movement in the united states after that but during the war after germany attacked the soviet union in 1941, then the united states and the british decide that it's important for the soviet union is to keep the soviets in the war. they were caught so offguard that the british were concerned that the soviets would capitulate at that point that the united states offers several things. the soviets made several demands and they promise matÉriel and they had a hard time delivering that for a number of reasons and for a couple of years. stalin said if you give them airplanes and other equipment we need to stay in the war, the united states tries under the effort of other people who are not quite assistance air in providing that so the second man was they wanted the same territorial concessions they have gotten from hitler in 1939 pact that their main demand was for the second front. they were fighting and the history of this period, the americans and the british throughout most of the war were fighting 10 nazi divisions combined and the soviets alone were fighti
times for medical evacuation to a field hospital, getting them to germany to the hospital at lamb stool and bringing them on to the united states as soon as they have stabilized has led to .. many of these young men, and they are mostly young men, a few women, but mostly young men, surviving wounds that would have surely killed them in any prior war, even ten or fifteen years ago, and i remember the first time i but at walter reed and i went, met with the first quadruple amputee, he lost both legs and both arms, and all he wanted was to drive a car again. and i saw him again, maybe six months later, with pro they tick arms and legs, prosthetic arms and legs, it is amazing what science and medicine is doing for these young people .. but nobody should estimate, underestimate the magnitude of the rehabilitation challenge and the courage that it takes, day in and day out to try and come back from these terrible wounds and that is where there is not enough we can do for these kids. >> rose: are we over stretched? >> i don't think so. i think we were over stretched at the end of 2006 .. and p
of modern totalitarianism, first not see germany and now communist russia. and on like chambers, we believe that the united states would eventually turn back the communist threat to western civilization, just as surely as it had done to the equally evil threat posed by not to germany. not, mind you, that we underestimated the might of the soviet military or the strength and the resolve of the anti anti-communist forces. against as both at home and abroad. in fact, there were times when we came close to a feeling that chambers and other conservative anti-communist like james vernon who wrote a book entitled suicide of the last, we feared that they might be right. for me, one especially discouraging occasion was the fight against ronald reagan's decision in 1983 to station medium-range misfiles in europe to counter the soviet buildup of similar misfiles on its side of the dividing line between its domain and the west. massive protests were planned here at home and all over the world with the biggest one scheduled for the aid to which over a million people from every country in western europe
surpluses to germany and japan. an astonishing number. 70% of the profits in the country were recycled into europe and japan. the marshall plan is a very small target. i will not bore you with details. when they go to washington, it is not an act of philanthropic on the pentagon -- and at the plant for be on the pentagon fell apart -- it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollar rise, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. a period of immense stability very low inflation. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why is that? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism was sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. well, paul volcker -- been named may ring a bell.
war. you don't see france going to war with germany or russia with poland. it used to happen all the time, but it's not happening. the best example of all was just a couple of weeks ago when gaza was fighting -- the palestinians were fighting with the israelis, and they lobbed a couple of missiles into tel aviv. i'm sure that both people on both sides could see that the day was coming that they'd be lobbing missiles into jerusalem. and this is what both the christian the jewish religion began there, and it's the holy land. it's some of the greatest tourist attractions in the world. people want to come from all overed world to see it, but not when a war is going on. they realized within a week of war they had made a terrible mistake to go to war. even though it's better to grumble at each other, but not to be shooting at each other and causing damage and wrecking the economy and upsetting people all over the world because these pictures, you have the bbc and cnn there having the pictures of the grandmothers and grandfathers and little children lined up on the street in front of ho
in germany. but the un has had a very strong influence on less. >> po will not old enough to remember, but jimmy carter gave billions of dollars to up alternate energy projects. >> i do remember. i was of the people who had to wait in gas lines in the 1970's. >> to any of those plants still exist? i don't think it lasted more than a couple of years. secondly, are you familiar with another program where he gave money to build five different steel mills, four of went with -- board of which went bankrupt almost immediately and the fifth one put at a business the plan in kansas city in. >> well, jimmy carter's programs did not work then, as i mentioned, i remember waiting in the 1970's in gas lines for one or two hours to fill up with gasoline in the western d.c. area. and just as these programs did not work then and they are not working now, they're unlikely to work in the future. it is just that the government is not good at picking winning projects. the government promised it would not have thought of picking the apple iphone five. that is something that is expensive, but people wait i
word the government in holland is sending patriot missiles to turkey following germany's lead, the dutch decision comes a day after germany agreed to send two patriot missile batteries and troops to turkey's southern border with syria. after nato's request. the country trying to prevent cross-border attacks against turkey after mortar rounds and shells have killed five people in turkey. shells that originated in syria. martha has more. martha: a lot of developments on this in the past several hours. international pressure is mounting against the assad regime in syria, amid fears they could use chemical weapons. there is evidence that they have loaded weapons with sarin gas. the u.s. defense secretary leon panetta issued this warning now to syria's leaders. watch this. >> there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using these chemical weapons on their own people. i'm not going to speculate or comment on what those potential consequences would be but i think it's fair enough to say that their use of those weapons would cross a red line for us. mar
.s. on that list? look who is next to us. >> behind the u.s. is germany and uae. united arab of emirates. >> when you go to dubai, did you see the islands? they are empty. nobody is there. >> that's what makes it a happy place. >> usa number one. we solved that problem. from rankings to spankings. after they gripped some have griped. mesa, arizona high school is getting a lot of crap for forcing two students to hold hands for punishment of fighting. the parents were giving the choice of suspension or holding hands in front of classmates. kids were laughing at them calling them name asking, are you gay? a photo of the boys sitting in the chair paw in paw ended up on facebook, a famous book of faces. one commenter said it encourages bull -- bullying and another says it sends a bad message to gay students. we asked a student to comment. >> that's not right. >> that student has been in a lot of our stories. they are always ready to talk to our cameras. bernie, did this punishment go too far or not far enough? >> let me just say that once again i am stunned. we were told that when they were passing th
syria. the ministry made clear the systems are purely defensive. germany and netherlands are supplying the pac three model as soon as their respective parliaments approve the deal which is expected to come soon. >> when that exactly will happen will depend on a number of practical issues that will be sorted out in the very near future. so i can't give you an exact date but i will tell you that the actual deployment of missiles will take place within weeks. >> hundreds of nato troops will also be deployed to install and operate these antimissile weapons but it doesn't appear right now that they will be u.s. troops, shep. >> shepard: sheriffs clinton was at that meeting in brussels. she aimed her words about the syria crisis at another country. >> yes. the secretary directed her comments to russia. she emphasized that the stain legs of these patriot systems in turkey is not meant to destabilize nato's already uneasy relationship with moscow. back here at state chided the russians for skipping upcoming crisis meeting on the syrian conflict. >> we want to see obviously, you know, russia co
. and it became obvious to countries like germany and the soviet union that this they could violate with impunity. in 1922 you had two decades leading to the second world wharf this -- war of this regime that wanted to revise the structure of global power and the status quo powers who weren't prepared to enforce it. there was one power and under this administration -- >> is iran the test case for whether or not these countries are going -- europe and the united states and in particular are going to enforce this world order? >> look, you have three presidents, president clinton, bush and obama have said explicitly that a nuclear iran is unacceptable. if the iranians are allowed to walk across the flesh hold with no opposition, that will demonstrate to other would t be aggressiveha regimes that there is no comp on the street. and that's what is happening. >> is this the year for the showdown on iran? >> simply is a matter of industrial mechanics, how much uranium you need to enrich. >> we humave been saying that for awhile though. and somehow there is a computer virusn that keeps kicking it down.
expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> ringling brothers and barnum & bailey circus is celebrating a court victory today. back in 2000 several animal rights groups sued the circus claiming its elephants were abused. today one of the groups, the american society for the prevention of cruelty to animals, agreed to settle its part of the suit and pay the circus more than $9 million. the courts found out that animal rights activists had paid a former circus employee to bring the suit. >>> head to virginia where federal authorities revealed an enormous drug bust at dulles international airport. customs and border protection officers seized nearly 214 pounds of khat last week. khat is a dangerous stimula
raising taxes. japan is now in official recession. southern europe is contracting. france and germany about to go into recession. what can't you guys learn? higher taxes don't work. melissa: yeah. but seems lying the public at large has not bought that argument. mitt romney tried to make that argument. a lot of people tried to make the argument. it hasn't worked. >> you emphasize what is the best way to get the economy moving again. means to end. instead of fighting on democrat's ground, establish your own ground. taxes does notn growth. greater spending does not mean growth. mammoth regulations taking away control from patients does not lead to growth. fight on your own turf instead of democrats. melissa: you're a master of negotiation. you know so much about this. how would you reset the negotiations? >> toss out a few grenades. passing in the house entitlement reforms can't take any benefits from existing beneficiaries. love to see the senate reject that one. how about another bill passing saying can not take money from medicare to finance obamacare. democrats will choke on it. exa
, in order to claim later that syria is the one that used these weapons. >> reporter: meanwhile, germany's cabinet endorsed a plan to deploy patriot missiles along turkey's border with syria. nato says the missiles will be used for defensive purposes, but in beijing today, the government of china objected. >> ( translated ): we have noticed the situation. china has always insisted on political resolution of tensions in syria issue through dialogue and consultation. highlighting military factors and strengthening military existence are not conducive to the resolution of conflicts and disputes, and inconducive to the >> brown: in syria today, heavy fighting continued around damascus, where government forces are trying to beat back encroaching rebel fighters. >> brown: with me now is fred hof, who's had an up-close look at both the on-the-ground and diplomatic efforts, serving until recently as secretary of state clinton's special advisor for transition in syria. he stepped down in september and is now a senior fellow at the atlantic council. mr. hof, welcome. looking at that meeting in dub
kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. a
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